Mr. Coco’s Top 6 Things to Consider for Online Promotion of Basketball Expertise


A wise man once said, “you never get a second chance to make first impression.”  Wrong!  Somebody said it, but who knows if they were wise.  Also, it may or may not have been said by a man.  One thing’s for you sure.   Messi didn’t say it!
“You never get a second chance to make a first impression” was actually the slogan for Head & Shoulders shampoo commercials back in the 1980’s.  Not to be confused with “you only get one chance to make a first impression” which was said by a wise man–Charles Jackson Smith, Sr. in 1960.
I know what you’re thinking. Who cares!  Right?  Wrong!
When it comes to the online presentation of your basketball expertise you should take both phrases very seriously.
Over the past few months, the iBall scout team has looked at hundreds of basketball profiles.  And what we’ve found is that when it comes to making a first impression, many are ‘dropping the ball.’
That’s why I asked Emir Coco to speak to some GM’s and agents and then put together a list of things everyone should think about before promoting basketball expertise on the internet.  Mr. Coco is something of an expert in the subject. He has years of experience using online basketball profiles to land jobs at the professional level.   Here’s what he came up with…

The Look.

Photos:
One head shot.  The rest should be action photos.  By action photos I mean photos taken during a game. Make sure that the pictures are of good quality.

Tips: Photos taken on playgrounds or unofficial games are sometimes not taken seriously.

The Content

Bio:

It should contain information about you like a player and at same time like a person. Your strengths and weaknesses, because a player that is aware of his weaknesses is a player that is willing to become a better player and person.   Bio should have information such as Date of Birth, Weight, Height, Playing position, etc. Languages that you speak are a plus because it’s really important for your adaptation to the team if you know the language. Information about where you have played before. You should put the year firstly, name of the team after. If you list the performance statistics, make sure to provide a link to validate them.  List the stats for as many teams as possible.

Achievements:

Here you should put all that you have won or achieved so far in you playing career. All the “MVP, Rebounder, Defender, Championship Awards” even the academics you can add.

The Platform (website):

Be very careful about where you share all this information.  As it is true, every link that you have out there is a potential place that you can have your profile to be viewed.  But by whom and at what expense?  Be smart about the information you share.  Displaying your street address, and where you and your girlfriend work, shop and go bowling are not necessary.

The best professional sites will give you other ways to be contacted besides publicizing all your personal contact information on the internet.  They will also go really hard to make sure Professional sites will only share your to be contacted by professionals that they allow to use the site.

iBall note: We’ve gotten alot of calls and emails saying that people are using public basketball forums to try to scam players and coaches.  We looked into it. What we found was quite disturbing.  One scammer that was targeting coaches was wanted in numerous countries for being a serial scam artist.  We’ll leave the details for another post, but we gotta touch on one.   So beware of where and what kind of information you’re showing to the world.

New Player forums are popping up every day. Most are nothing more than basketball chat sites. Others do serve a static networking purpose. If you’ve read our 5-page report about player profiles, you’ll understand there’s a big difference between a static site and a dynamic site like iBall United.

The References:

Who can be contacted to provide insight about you as a player and a person.  It should be someone with a proven track record at the level you want to play at.  Coaches, agents, GMs all make strong references.  Other players are OK, but they could just be friends that want to help you.   Professional scouting reports make strong references.

Make sure you provide information to contact the reference.  You don’t have to publicize their contact information, but make sure you can provide it if asked.

The Video:

The setup of videos is different for every player, depending on which position you are playing because coaches are evaluating different aspects of your game.  Big men and point guards do not have the same qualities and will not be asked to play the same role, so the videos should be different.

In your videos you definitely want to show your strong sides, but do not hide your weaknesses.  If you do that on a professional level, they observe it fast and in some cases can be bad for you.  The person scouting will come away with more questions about your game than interest.

This is how you should setup your videos.

Offense:

Your one-on-one game in different scenarios.  Facing up.  Back to the basket.  Pick & rolls and pick & pops.  Show a few of each.

Movement without the ball: Footwork, cuts, backdoors.

Shooting skills:
Set shots, shots coming off screens, and shots off the dribble.
Pulling up off the dribble. (Mid and long distance)

Transition Game:
How you switch from defense to offense

Defense:

1 on 1 game. Show that you can control your opponent. Team defense positions.  Your footwork and reads as the ball moves from strong-side to weak-side.   Help defense, how you react when your teammates are not able to stop during the defensive strategy.

Special Skills:

Rebounding: Show that you’re involved. That you’re not afraid to mix it up.  Your boxout technique. Your outlet technique.

Passing:  Show passes that occur in the flow of the game. Passes that lead to scores, your ability to feed and pass out of the post, and etc.

Other special skills (blocks, steals).

Other Attributes:

Intimidation, Energy, Effort – These are very important. Scouts are looking to see if you are hard worker.  Over time, the effort you put forth will determine if you reach or exceed your full potential.

Note:  It is really important that the videos are of good quality and that the camera is getting it good focus, not too much close up. Make sure the videos are focused on you.  If you have a subpar game but there is a player in the same game of the same position and played the game of his life, you might want to reconsider using that video because the scout may want to contact him.

The Contact Information:

First thing should be an email address, but that doesn’t mean it must be publicly displayed for everyone to see.  If you do display an email address, make sure it is a professional format.  For example: (johnbrown@………). So it has your first name and last name in it, or at least one of the two.   Also, if you have Facebook, Twitter, Skype or any other different social network accounts, make sure you provide that on your page that people can see everything you are doing and writing.

Note:  Be careful with you behavior on this type of sites, because sometimes a coach can visit that content and if he\she sees any unethical content show you in a bad light.  You’d be surprised how much weight is given to your character as compared to your skill level.   50/50 is not an exaggeration.

Learn more about how iBall United is helping players to build and sustain professional careers by visiting our website at http://www.iballunited.net

iBall United works for you:
•Finding Teams and Agents,  •Evaluating Offers or Contracts,  •Creating and Publicizing Professional  •Marketing Packages  •Pro Camps and Tryouts  •Online Exposure  •Pro Player Education Guide   •Finding Answers to Common Questions

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About iBall United

A Sports Management, Marketing, and Consulting Agency.
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